SinBin.vegas

Praise Be To Foley, Vegas Golden Knights Hockey Website

Author: Jason Pothier Page 1 of 39

Most Offer Sheets Get Matched, Now What?

GM George McPhee isn’t much of an offer sheet guy.

I’ve never signed an offer sheet.-George McPhee

And never has been.

In McPhee’s more than 20 years as a GM he’s neither handed out nor had to match an offer sheet.

The Golden Knights front office lead spoke earlier in the month about the ineffectiveness of adding players through the offer sheet process. The compensation (both to the player and to his former team) is entirely too much for a team to take the risk. In McPhee’s mind, it’s a meaningless ploy that hasn’t made much of an impact in free agency.

I don’t know what will transpire going forward, but historically they’re matched. Teams find a way to match, and will find other ways to address things in the organization if you’re in a pinch. -McPhee

After a failed offer sheet by the Montreal Canadiens this offseason some are calling to rip up offer sheets altogether.

I don’t think we’re going to get any more offer sheets. The Montreal example is an important one to remember. The Montreal offer sheet wasn’t even a realistic offer sheet… it didn’t go the full amount it could’ve gone. It was an easy one for the Carolina Hurricanes to match. –Michael Traikos on TSN Ottawa 1200

If the offer sheet process ends in a team matching the offer 99% of the time then it’s really time to amend or cut the procedure. Only thirteen offer sheets have been accepted in NHL history and the last time a team didn’t match was twelve years ago. Edmonton unwisely gave Anaheim a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd round draft picks for Dustin Penner.

More offer sheets would add a little spice to the NHL. Having players switching teams this early would be interesting but we’re not going to see it if you have to give up so many picks. -Traikos on TSN Ottawa 1200

In fact, not only do offer sheets rarely get accepted but they are rarely offered. Prior to Montreal’s to Sebastian Aho, the last time a player was given an offer sheet was in 2013. And, of course, it was matched.

Read More

National Analysts Give Mixed Reviews on the Golden Knights Offseason

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

ESPN, Sportsnet, and NBC Sports graded all 31 NHL team’s offseason thus far, and unsurprisingly, many weren’t impressed with what George McPhee and Kelly McCrimmon have been up to.

On NBCSports.com, the Golden Knights were ranked #22 on their power rankings, and two names were the reason for the low mark.

Vegas Golden Knights. They are going to miss Colin Miller, and might really miss out on Nikita Gusev if they move him before they even realize what they had. –Adam Gretz, NBCSports

Greg Wyshynski of ESPN took a much more global approach while looking at Vegas’ offseason. It really doesn’t matter who’ve they’ve lost, or added, if the Golden Knights’ stars play at an elite level, they’ll be a Cup contending team.

Vegas Golden Knights: If Max Pacioretty, Paul Stastny and Mark Stone play like they did in the playoffs, the Golden Knights will have a new top line. It makes sense, as the trio of Jonathan Marchessault, William Karlsson and Reilly Smith has been successful because the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. … Where does Alex Tuch fit in? He was fourth on the team in scoring last season (and could have been first with a full 82 games), but comes into this season penciled in outside the top-six. –Greg Wyshynski, ESPN

SportsNet’s Luke Fox was extremely high on VGK’s offseason so far, especially how they were able to negotiate multiple team-friendly deals.

George McPhee continues to impress. Securing a 26-year-old William Karlsson — a top-two centre whose defensive attributes don’t get enough credit — through his prime at under $6 million per season should look like a steal a couple of years from now. The trading of Colin Miller was a necessary cap casualty, and getting two years of 28-year-old playmaker Brandon Pirri (12 goals in 31 games last season) for a hair over the league minimum was my favourite bargain buy on Canada Day. –Luke Fox, SportsNet

For the most part, analysts have been kind to the Golden Knights and their offseason decisions. The main reason for that is the core of the team is intact and under contract. Colin Miller has been brought up by several outlets as a big-time loss, I think most of us would disagree.

However, as far as we’re concerned here at SinBin.vegas, the Golden Knights offseason gets a grade of incomplete. Their offseason will be judged on one move and one move alone.

Golden Knights Organization Offer World Class Training to Prospects

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

One heavy point of emphasis for Golden Knights prospects at Development Camp was the importance of their strength and conditioning regimens.

Cody Glass spoke with us about his strict diet that was designed by the Golden Knights organization. At first, he had trouble eating his nutritional menu but soon realized it was for his own good.

It’s always been a struggle for me to put on weight. Gary Roberts has been helping me along the way. I went to him last year and he’s just given me tips on how to be a better player and a better professional. It all starts with eating healthy. It sucks at first but when you get used to it, it’s a lot better and it’ll help down the road. -Cody Glass

The Gary Roberts he’s talking about is a former NHL player turned into a well-known strength and conditioning guru. He’s helped proven NHL’ers like Connor McDavid and Mark Schiefele get faster and stronger. Over the past few years, the Golden Knights have tapped Roberts’ resources to help develop their pipeline.

Focusing on working on developing my legs. Adding muscle mass while maintaining my speed. I do a lot of cardio and muscle mass type workouts. I’m always talking to Wil Nichol and Gary Roberts about stuff that can help my game. They’ll talk to me throughout the year and give their input on what I should add to my workouts and regiment to help get to that next level. -Brandon Kruse

Jack Dugan will begin his sophomore year at Providence College this fall, but both GM Kelly McCrimmon and assistant coach Mike Kelly agreed he looked like a grown man, not a college student. That’s because Dugan has followed the guidance of the Golden Knights training staff since his draft date.

Read More

3rd Line Success Comes Down To Tuch

Will they sign him? Will they trade him? What in the world is going to happen with Nikita Gusev?

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

That’s just about the only thing anyone wants to talk about regarding the Golden Knights. However, the key to the 3rd line isn’t Nikita Gusev, it’s actually Alex Tuch.

Tuch found himself on the 2nd line for a majority of the year last year, but in the first year, he played mostly on the 3rd line with Cody Eakin. That appears to be where he’ll end up again, and whether it’s with Gusev, Brandon Pirri, or someone else, Tuch’s offense should be enough to make that a solid line.

Alex Tuch – 2017-18
78 Games Played
37 Points (15 goals, 22 assists)
Record w/ Tuch in lineup: 48-23-7
Record when Tuch scores a goal: 12-2-0
Record when Tuch registers a point: 23-7-0
29 Points (13 goals, 16 assists) in 48 VGK wins
8 Points, -12 in 23 VGK losses
4 Game-Winning Goals

Alex Tuch – 2018-19
74 Games Played
52 Points (20 goals, 32 assists)
Record w/ Tuch in lineup: 39-28-7
Record when Tuch scores a goal: 14-5-0
Record when Tuch registers a point: 26-10-2
38 Points (13 goals, 16 assists) in 39 VGK wins
12 Points, -14 in 28 VGK losses
6 Game-Winning Goals

Over his two seasons with Vegas, the 23-year-old has averaged .59 points per game, which jumped significantly to .70 points per game in 2018-19. There’s no reason to believe it won’t increase again. If Tuch can climb close to a point per game than the third line won’t be an issue in 2019-2020 no matter who he plays with.

Read More

VGK Three Year Olds Are Developing Into Men

When Cody Glass was drafted in 2017, he stood 6’1″, weighing in at 175lbs. Two years later, Glass is filling in nicely.

Yeah I think I’m 190lbs now, and I’m 6’2 and a half. I’m not close to my brother or my dad, but it’s nice to see some improvement on my weight and height. -Glass

Since becoming a Golden Knights prospect he was told to add weight and muscle while developing in WHL and the AHL.

It’s always been a struggle for me to put on weight… the team has been helping me along the way. They gave me tips on how to be a better player and a better professional. It all starts with eating the healthy. It sucks at first but when you get used to it, it’s a lot better and it’ll help down the road. -Glass

Same goes for prospect Jack Dugan, who was sizably different from his first Golden Knights development camp.

Jack, to me, looks like a man now. That’s a guy who’s improving leaps and bounds.”-Kelly McCrimmon

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Both director of player development Wil Nichol and assistant coach Mike Kelly echoed those same thoughts, almost word for word.

Dugan, a sophomore at Providence College, knew he had the talent when Vegas selected him in 2017, but he knew he needed to get stronger. So he began training more off the ice and in the gym.

When I was drafted I had never been in a weight room before. This past two years that’s been the main focus, more so off the ice. I think my on-ice ability got me drafted. Put the two together and I think I have a pretty good chance. -Dugan

Incoming General Manager Kelly McCrimmon spoke at length about the growth and strength development of players attending their third camp. It’s the one thing that’s most noticeable year-to-year.

Seeing players come back year to year to year, it gives an appreciation for how development actually works. And for the time it takes for guys to get there… Specifically with Cody, he’s a good example. When you look at the difference in Cody from year one, to year two, to year three you see a player that’s bigger, stronger, faster, more confidence. -McCrimmon

It breaks down to commitment and discipline. Unfortunately, pizza and fried chicken aren’t in that equation.

No, stay away from it. Unless it’s the end of the season. -Glass

For the record, the SinBin.vegas crew ate pizza literally an hour before we spoke to Glass. We’ve yet to find the link between terrible eating habits and poor blogging.

The Krebs: A Family Full of Dreams That Come True

Friday night was one the Krebs family has been envisioning for a very long time. You might’ve noticed the 17th overall surrounded by his proud parents and siblings as his name was being called. The handshakes, hugs, kisses, and tears of joy. It was a made for TV moment.

My parents could tell early on that Peyton had something special. His heart has always been with hockey and to see his dreams come true at the Draft was so amazing. My family’s passion and love for the game is steadfast. Hockey has brought so much joy to my parents and brothers lives. -Maddison Krebs, Sister and Professional Musician

Peyton’s sister Maddison was spotlighted by NBCSports after Vegas made their 1st round selection. We chatted with Maddison following last weekend’s Draft. Like her brother, she chased her dream and is a successful singer/songwriter living in Nashville. Peyton and Maddison both recognized their passion early on, and their parents stood by in support.

Just like my brother’s, I found what I loved to do very early on. My parents gave us kids dream books when we were little. In the book, you write all your goals and dreams with a picture. This inspired us to always go after what’s in our hearts. My parents bought me a guitar when I was 7 and that’s when my big dreams where born. Since then I’ve dedicated myself to my dreams in music and it’s been an amazing journey so far. -Maddison Krebs

Quite like a young hockey players first stick, Maddison was gifted her first instrument and the music began to flow. Before they were teens, the Krebs’ kids were on their future path to dream careers, and it was never deterred by Cindy or Greg Krebs.

All the boys played high-level hockey and I was competing in dancing, along with pursuing music. This was all happening prior to any of us having our driver’s licenses. And we of course only have two parents, so that can give you a pretty good idea of our crazy schedules! We could not have done any of this without our parents. -Maddison Krebs

Let’s be honest, most parents would remind their children it’s nearly impossible to become a professional athlete or a professional musician. Most tend to lead their children down a traditional college/business route. It’s the logical approach for parents. But not for Cindy and Greg. They gave their four children the support to grow and flourish. (The other two Krebs boys are both hockey players. Dakota, 20 plays in the WHL, and Dru, 16, plays in their hometown of Okotoks for the Okotoks Oilers.)

Read More

Could Montreal Show Interest in Colin Miller?

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

TSN’s Darren Dreger reported this week the Montreal Canadiens are looking to bolster their blueline. The Golden Knights are expected to make some moves this offseason and 26-year-old defenseman Colin Miller could be one of the players involved. We’ve speculated Miller could be moved in an attempt to make space for Golden Knights defensive prospects (Nic Hague, Jimmy Schuldt, Zach Whitecloud) and continue to build up organizational depth.

The sense that I’m getting is that (Bergevin’s) in the market for a good young defenseman. I don’t know who that might be, but if that’s what he’s looking for than he’s going to have to give up a good player or players. -Darren Dreger, TSN Montreal

Other defensemen rumored to be available are Islanders’ Nick Leddy, Toronto’s Nikita Zaitsev, and Calgary’s TJ Brodie. All three cost $4.5-$5.5M against the salary cap, and two shoot left-handed. Miller is more affordable (3.875M) and carries a right-handed stick.

Are there players, or is there a player that maybe didn’t have as good of a season as the team or the player expected last year of has struggled the last couple of seasons? Maybe that individual needs a change of scenery. -Dreger

One thing Montreal will take into consideration is Miller’s disappointing 2018-19 season. Accuracy was a major problem for Miller shooting a career low (2.3%), only edging out Deryk Engelland (1.9%) for the worst percentage for Golden Knights players with a minimum of 100 shots. The Canadiens front office could see that as a good problem. Montreal defenseman Shea Weber has one of history’s most lethal shots, and this could add some vital assistance.

There’s a lot of talk. There’s a lot of chatter out there. I’m going to be curious see how much of it is connected to the RFA, the restricted free agent pool. I look at the Vegas Golden Knights… they don’t have William Karlsson signed yet and they’ve got a lot of money. They’re at the cap and they’ve got players that they’ve got to attend too. I think more than ever, there are so many contracts that potentially are trying to be moved. I had a high profile player agent tell me the other he thinks there are at least 35 contracts in the league that are in play. -Dreger

Another note to mention is Montreal GM Marc Bergevin tends to make a splash early. Over the past few years Bergevin has traded for Shea Weber, Jonathan Drouin, and Max Domi in mid to late June. Miller’s not quite a big fish but he could fill a large need for the Canadiens.

To what degree and what is the willingness from Montreal’s standpoint to put up a good player, or players, or prospects, or draft picks to acquire this piece. -Dreger

The Golden Knights front office are clearly comfortable working with Bergevin after both parties came away satisfied after the Max Pacioretty trade late last summer. Who knows maybe both teams will work on future deals together. Possibly starting this Saturday.

Cody Eakin Sustainability Study

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Golden Knights center Cody Eakin had quite the year for Vegas. In his 8th season the 28-year-old Manitoban added career highs in Goals (22), Goals Created (17), Points (41), Points Per Game (.53), Plus/Minus (+19), Shooting % (18.3), and Point Shares (5.2). Vegas benefited greatly by Eakin’s substantial offensive upgrade from 2017–18.

Plain and simple, everyone is quietly asking the same question; Can Eakin do it again next season?

Eakin’s first standout season was in 2013-14 as a member of the Dallas Stars. He totaled 35 points (16 goals, 19 assists) averaging 17:20 minutes of ice time per game. Eakin’s strong campaign carried over to the following season with Dallas.

In 2014-15, Eakin again performed up to his abilities, even sprinkling in a few more points. The center collected 40 points (19 goals, 21 assists) averaging 17:12 TOI. Eakin added another 35 points (16 goals, 19 assists) in 2015-16, tallying a total of 110 points (51 goals, 59 assists) in three consecutive seasons. Consistent numbers for a middle six center. And by the way I never mentioned his reliability killing a penalty.

After a couple of dim seasons offensively in 2016-17 with Dallas, and 2017-18 with Vegas, Eakin cracked 40 points for the second time in his career. So, the answer is yes. Yes, Cody Eakin can repeat his success from last season, but will he?

One mindless and obvious element to my prediction is that Eakin is playing for his next contract. After the 2019-2020 season, the veteran will become an unrestricted free agent and his $3.85M cap hit will come off the books. Players tend to perform well in contract years (see pretty much ever VGK player in 2017-18), and I expect the same from #21.

Taking a look at next season’s roster, we’ll have to assume Eakin will be playing with two highly skilled offensive players. Nikita Gusev or Erik Haula could join Alex Tuch and form one of the deepest third lines in hockey centered by Eakin. No matter what the combination ends up being, it’ll be the most talent he’s anchored in Vegas. Which is why it’s hard to believe Eakin wouldn’t repeat his success from last season.

Then again he could get bumped to the fourth line, or even more drastic, get traded. In that case burn my prediction and this article altogether.

(See, we can write a whole article about Cody Eakin without referencing a certain penalty. I knew we could do it!)

Can You Win With $8+ Million Players?

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

There are plenty of differences between the Golden Knights and the two Stanley Cup participants? However, there’s one you may not have thought about, and one TSN’s Pierre LeBrun thinks is significant.

Neither the Blues nor the Bruins have a player making more than $8 million per year.

The St. Louis Blues highest paid players, Vladimir Tarsenko and Ryan O’Reilly earn $7.5 million annually. Center David Krejci is the Boston Bruins wealthiest player making $7.2 million per season. Needless to say, the team that hoists the Stanley Cup will do so without one of the league’s highest-paid players.

LeBrun brought up a running conversation among hockey execs on Vancouver radio during the conference finals.

The four teams we have left in the playoffs do not have a single player making more than $8 million. Is there something there, or is just a one off? No one has a double digit player. The money is spread out… Is that they way to go? Is that the way you find depth? -Pierre LeBrun, TSN

An $8 million player makes up for roughly 11% of a team’s salary cap. Golden Knights winger Mark Stone will begin collecting his dough next season when his 8-year/$76 million deal kicks in. That will make Stone the 12th highest paid player in the NHL. His $9.5 million yearly payout will be the third most for a winger, which could move to fourth once Mitch Marner inks a deal. Stone’s cap hit next season will be 11.63% of the team’s available cap.

The theory was debunked by the last two Stanley Cup champions. Alex Ovechkin’s $9.53 million didn’t hurt the Washington Capitals Stanley Cup run. Nor did the salaries of Sidney Crosby ($8.7 million) and Evgeni Malkin ($9.5 million) affect the Pittsburgh Penguins from 2015-2017. In total, they are the only three players in NHL history to raise a Stanley Cup making an average of $8 million per season. While it’s a practical theory, it’s hard to argue against retaining and signing elite NHL players.

Read More

“He’s A Man That Just Oozes Character”

(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

First it was Kawhi Leonard nailing an improbable buzzer-beater, then Mark Stone scored a power-play game-winner with 1.8 seconds left to beat Slovakia. Needless to say, it was a pretty good 24 hours for Canadian sports. (And, not a bad birthday for #61.)

That line had been pretty quiet. They really had been. The power play had clicked through the early going of this tournament with Stone and Marchessault. -Darren Dreger, TSN

TSN reporter Darren Dreger is in Slovakia for the IIHF World Championship tournament and got a chance to speak intimately with Stone about an array of topics, including Game 7, Canadian pride, and leadership.

We had high expectations for us. As an organization, we want to be deemed as one of the best teams in the league and we felt like we had one of the best teams in the league. We’re going to move on and get better from this. There’s no doubt in my mind that we’re going to be a competitive team going forward for a long time in Vegas. -Mark Stone

Dreger points out that Team Canada has an awful lot of critics and Stone’s veteran, star power presence has helped keep an untested Canadian men’s hockey team focused.

He’s a man that just oozes character, and on top of that he’s a gifted hockey player. The character he brought over and into this lineup was vastly needed given the inexperience of Team Canada. Add to that they lose John Tavares and things could’ve gone sideways… He most definitely, Mark Stone is the primary leader. -Dreger

Read More

Page 1 of 39

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén

SinBin.vegas

SinBin.vegas