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Tag: Ryan Reaves (Page 1 of 2)

The Ryan Reaves vs. George McPhee Hand Of Poker Was Won By #75

The Golden Knights clearly value plays like this one. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Since today marks exactly 75 days until the regular season, it seemed a good day to talk about the Golden Knights #75, Ryan Reaves.

Reaves was acquired by Vegas a few days before the trade deadline in which the Golden Knights acted as the third party in a deal that sent Derick Brassard from the Senators to the Penguins.

At the time, the Golden Knights were going through a rough patch injury-wise. James Neal, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, William Carrier were all in-and-out of the lineup and subsequent injuries to David Perron and Reilly Smith kept Reaves on the ice for every game in the regular season.

Then, the playoffs came and with a healthy roster, Reaves was out of the lineup, behind Ryan Carpenter and William Carrier. As the playoffs progressed, William Carrier got injured, Carpenter, Tomas Tatar and David Perron fell out of the lineup, and Reaves became a mainstay on the fourth line. In the Western Conference Finals Reaves scored the game-winning goal that clinched the Golden Knights trip to the Stanley Cup Final. He then backed that goal up with a tally in Game 1 of the Final.

When the season ended, he was set to become an unrestricted free agent and comments from GM George McPhee made it sound like Reaves was not going to re-sign with Vegas prior to July 1st and probably not at all.

We made our offer, they said they’d circle back but they are looking for a longer term deal. If he gets the longer term deal then he won’t be coming back. But in that transaction, we got a player and a 4th round pick understanding that the player might leave. -George McPhee on 6/24/18

As it turns out, he got the longer term deal and still came back. So what happened?

A few days before July 1st, when Reaves was officially eligible to sign with any team in the NHL, he made it clear to any other team pursuing him that he was going to stay in Vegas. On June 30th, that happened as he signed a two-year deal worth $2.775 million per year.

Reaves was two years and basically, there was a lot of interest in him. There was a lot of competition for him. We simply took the money from a three-year deal and pushed it into two. -McPhee on 7/1/18

The question is, why? Why on June 30th would the Golden Knights be willing to break down and admittedly overpay for a player they seemed perfectly content losing a week prior? 

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VGK Free Agency Tracker

)(Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

  • Ryan Reaves has re-signed with the Golden Knights on a two year $2.775 million AAV deal. (Source: @DarrenDreger)
  • David Perron has signed with St. Louis on a four year $4 million AAV deal. (Source: @FriedgeHNIC)
  • Paul Stastny has signed with the Golden Knights for three years at $6.5 million AAV. (Source: @TSNBobMcKenzie)
  • Nick Holden has signed with the Golden Knights for two years at $2.2 million AAV. (Source: @PierreVLeBrun)
  • A trade for Erik Karlsson and Bobby Ryan still appears very much in play (Source: @TSNBobMcKenzie)
  • James Neal has signed with the Calgary Flames for five years at $5.75 million AAV. (Source: @TSNBobMcKenzie)
  • Brandon Pirri has re-signed with the Golden Knights on a one year, two-way deal worth $650,000 NHL, $250,000 AHL. (Source: @renlavoietva)
  • The Golden Knights have re-signed Maxime Lagace on a two-way deal at $650,000. (Source: @renlavoietva)
  • Zach Fucale has signed a one year two-way deal worth $650,000. He’s a waiver exempt goalie who has yet to make his NHL debut. Previously in Montreal’s system. (Source: @renlavoietva)
  • The Golden Knights have signed Curtis McKenzie, a 27-year-old winger previously with the Dallas organization bouncing between NHL and AHL. Deal is two years worth $750,000 AAV. (Source: DhaliwalSports)
  • Daniel Carr has signed with the Golden Knights. Scored 14 goals in 98 games with the Canadiens including six last season in 38 games. One year, $750,000. (Source: @BBarts, @PierreVLeBrun)
  • Golden Knights announced the signings of Alex Gallant and Jimmy Oligny. Both career AHLers. (Source: VGK Press Release)
  • Luca Sbisa will not be re-signing with the Golden Knights (Source: SinBin.vegas)
  • George McPhee will hold a press conference at 2PM to discuss today’s transactions.

 

The Free Agency Tracker is brought to you by Adam S. Kutner and Associates, the best Las Vegas personal injury attorney.

Potential Replacements For James Neal, David Perron, And Ryan Reaves

Since George McPhee’s “not everyone will be back” quote there’s been a growing fear that the Golden Knights roster won’t be as strong in Year 2 as it was in the magical Year 1. McPhee noted there are always three or four changes which has the speculation on James Neal, David Perron, Luca Sbisa, and Ryan Reaves running wild.

Sportsnet reported earlier this season that James Neal was looking for a long-term deal commanding upwards of $7M per season.

It’s mildly surprising that he hasn’t re-signed in Las Vegas because he would like to stay there. He’s one of the team leaders. It still could get done. –USA Today

Remember when this happened? (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

It’s hard to believe the organization would give a massive contract to a player over the age of 30, but would they on a player who’s 29?

Potential Replacement:

James Van Riemsdyk
29 Years-old
2017-18 Stats: 36 Goals (11 PPG), 18 Assists, 14:54 ATOI
Career Stats: 201 Goals, 393 Points, 0.33 Goals Per Game, 0.65 Points Per Game
Contract Speculation: 7 Years, $6M+ AAV

Neal has 62 more career goals and is one year and 243 days older than van Riemsdyk. Both wingers have comparable career statistics, and the age difference isn’t wide. The Golden Knights know what they’re getting with Neal; 20+ goals, second-line minutes, plays with edge. It’s an unknown if van Riemsdyk can repeat his success in Vegas.

I could see Neal being offered a high-cost, short-term contract, but the question remains if we would be willing to sign it. It’s likely his last chance at a long-term deal. One thing is for sure, if the Golden Knights offer JVR a contract, it’s a sign they’re content moving on from Neal.

Van Riemsdyk was integral to the Leafs’ potent first power-play unit but was otherwise seeing third-line minutes. On another squad — Carolina? Vegas? New York? New Jersey? San Jose? — he’d be a top-six fixture again. -Sportsnet

He’s said all the right things about coming back, but it’s going to take a discount to make it actually happen. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

David Perron is a player many fans fell in love with. His silky hands, his beautiful passing, his pestering ways, how can you not love him? With Perron, the feeling is mutual. He loves it in Vegas, he loves his teammates, and he’d love to stay here. Or at least so he says to Vegas media.

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“Not Everyone Will Be Back”; A Look Into VGK’s Free Agency Situation (Plus 9 Predictions)

Reading between the lines, either Neal or Perron likely won’t be back. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

The Golden Knights were close to the ultimate goal, but in the end, they fell three wins short. So, they now head to the offseason with a plan in mind, make the team three wins better than they were a year ago.

There are plenty of decisions to be made with the roster as currently constructed and oodles of cap space available to bring in outside help.

The reality is in a salary cap world you have to make some tough decisions, and with this team, not everyone will be back. We’ve all learned lessons over the years, if you examine what happens in the salary cap world you have to be smart about what you do and the contracts you hand out or it hurts your team. We’ll do our best to keep this group together but there are always three or four changes. -George McPhee

The Golden Knights have four major unrestricted free agents (UFA’s) which are set to hit the open market on July 1st. They are James Neal, David Perron, Ryan Reaves, and Luca Sbisa. Also, Maxime Lagace, Jason Garrison, Brandon Pirri, Mikhail Grabovski, Clayton Stoner, Chris Casto, and Paul Thompson will become UFA’s in 20 days.

It doesn’t matter where in the lineup, you have to be smart about what you do. -McPhee

Then there are the restricted free agents (RFA’s) of which the Golden Knights have plenty. The most notable is William Karlsson. In short, Karlsson is not going anywhere. Unless something unprecedented happens, he’ll absolutely remain the first line center for Vegas next season. However, the projections on his contract are all over the map.

Technically, the Golden Knights only have to extend a “qualifying offer” to Karlsson of $1 million. This will happen soon and then Karlsson and his agent will request arbitration. An arbitration date will be set sometime in late July to early August. That will basically be the deadline for the Golden Knights and Karlsson to reach a long-term extension.

Tomas Nosek, Colin Miller, Oscar Dansk, Teemu Pulkkinen, Stefan Matteau, and Philip Holm are also all arbitration eligible and would follow the same process.

Finally, there are the two younger players who are RFA’s in Shea Theodore and William Carrier. Due to their age, neither are arbitration eligible. Thus, the Golden Knights can simply extend them a qualifying offer (Theodore -$874,125, Carrier – $787,500) and the player will have to sign it and remain with the team through next season. However, especially with a player like Theodore, this offseason may be a good time to lock him up long-term before he gets arbitration rights and has more negotiating power. The two sides can come to an agreement on a long-term deal at any time.

That brings us to the magical world of unrestricted free agency which opens on July 1st. Names like John Tavares, James van Riemsdyk, and John Carlson will be thrown around with basically every team that has cap space. The Golden Knights have plenty of cap space so get used to seeing the big names linked to Vegas, but the Golden Knights also have a GM that’s historically not a big spender in free agency.

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Stanley Cup Final Game 1, Only In Vegas

It was always going to be special, just how special though was yet to be seen. The opening game of the Stanley Cup Final, in Las Vegas, with an expansion team taking the ice. The stage was massive and the expectation was for something never seen before.

This site was created to follow a hockey team, one that just won a game in the Stanley Cup Final, so we kind of have to start with the actual hockey.  Thus, we’ll go at it backwards, beginning with the empty netter to seal the win and ending with some combination of Lil Jon, Travis Barker, Lee Greenwood.

William Karlsson scored, but his line tallied an uncharacteristic 0 +/- rating. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

The Golden Knights hockey team cannot be defined in one way like many often attempt to, and on the biggest stage the sport has to offer, they proved it once again.  Most of this postseason it’s been about Marc-Andre Fleury’s dominance between the pipes, yet tonight was far from his best. The Golden Knight defense has been carrying the torch slowing down the potent Jets and Sharks and allowing the Kings virtually nothing, yet tonight, they were a kind of a mess. The top line of Jonathan Marchessault, William Karlsson, and Reilly Smith can usually be leaned on to dominate stretches of the game, yet tonight they were hot and cold.

Normally when plans A, B, and C go by the wayside a team is sunk Not the Golden Knights because they have narratives for days. Tonight’s is not a new one at all, it’s one that’s followed them all year and is constantly referenced even when not on display in a game. Tonight was about depth.

It’s great when you see those guys get rewarded. They got three huge goals for us tonight. -Gerard Gallant

After playing a series in which there were zero lead changes in five games, the Golden Knights and Capitals Game 1 saw four, the most in the history of a Stanley Cup Final game. The last one was because of a trio of unanswered goals from none other than Ryan Reaves and Tomas Nosek, who scored two.

Sometimes we can’t create a lot of offense, tonight somehow it bounced right for us. It’s not really magical play we are doing, there’s not really a crazy recipe. We are just trying to outwork who we are playing against and tonight we got rewarded. -Pierre-Edouard Bellemare

The storylines are always different, but kinds of remain the same. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

There are so many different weapons in the Golden Knights arsenal. If it’s not Fleury, it’s the defense. If it’s not the defense, it’s the top line. If it’s not the top line, it’s the depth players. If it’s not the depth players it’s luck or bounces or opportunity or something completely else. In the end, no matter the path, it usually results in the same thing, a win.

But the night was not just about the on-ice product, it was everything. Gladys Knight, Criss Angel, Lee Greenwood, Lil Jon, and of course Michael Buffer. Like the Expansion Draft with the players, it didn’t all make sense, no one really knew how or if it would all fit, but it did.

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Ryan Reaves Earned His Golden Moment For Vegas

Just like we all expected; Ryan Reaves with the series-clinching goal of the Western Conference Finals. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Game 5 hero Ryan Reaves has only been a Golden Knight for four months but is easily the most polarizing player in franchise history. That was up until yesterday’s series clinching goal.

Reaves is a big body that can hold his own in front of the net. His strength around the crease opens up shooting lanes for his teammates, which is what happened on Reaves’ game winning tip in. Defenseman Luca Sbisa saw some light and let it sling. Like they’ve done hundreds of times together in practice, Reaves kept his eye on the biscuit and deflected it over Jets goaltender Connor Hellebuyck.

You’re always trying to get some offensive opportunities. You don’t want to be running around, getting some hits and not doing anything. You try and help out on the scoreboard anyway you can. -Ryan Reaves to SinBin.vegas on 5/15/18

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12th Forward

He was added to give the Golden Knights depth for the playoffs, now that they are here, will he even play? (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Due to the string of injuries down the stretch and a slew of maintenance days over the final week, the All Star head coach Gerard Gallant has never had a full complement of players in which to choose his lineup. However, as the team prepares for a first round matchup with the Los Angeles Kings, it appears the Golden Knights have just about everyone healthy, which means choices for Gallant.

The top six is almost a guarantee to be set as it has for much of the season. A first line of William Karlsson, Jonathan Marchessault, and Reilly Smith, and a second line of Erik Haula, James Neal, and David Perron.

Using our judgment here at SinBin.vegas, we believe Alex Tuch, Cody Eakin, Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, and Tomas Nosek are also all guarantees to be in the lineup come Game 1. That leaves two spaces open that need to be filled with a group of 5 players. Those players are Tomas Tatar, Ryan Carpenter, William Carrier, Ryan Reaves, and Oscar Lindberg needing to fill roles as third and fourth line wingers.

At the trade deadline, Geroge McPhee added Tomas Tatar to be the third line winger with Eakin and Tuch. Due to the injuries, he has bounced around lines and his play has never quite lived up to what was to be expected of him. However, now that the playoffs are here and the top six are all expected to be back, Tatar will almost certainly find his way into the position he was brought to play in and draw the start against the Kings.

That leaves us with four guys to fill one vital role for the Golden Knights, fourth line winger. On the other 11 forwards, we’ve got a pretty strong idea, on this one, we’re clueless as to which way Gallant will go. So, we’ve put together a list of pros and cons for each of the potential option and then took our stabs at who each of us believes will draw into the lineup on Wednesday.

Ryan Reaves
36 Playoff games
(1 goal, -1, 7:56 ATOI, 23 PIM)

Pros: We all know what Reaves brings to the ice. Love it or hate it, he can be effective. Over his career, he dressed for 36 of 58 playoff games his teams played in. Last season, he played in all 11 games adding 42 hits, nine blocks and eight penalty minutes. Reaves was brought in just in time for the home and home with LA. Possibly a sign that Gallant could decide to go with Reaves in the first round.

Cons: Lack of speed, finishing ability, and potential to slow down transition game. The Golden Knights high tempo could earn Reaves a scratch or little TOI. His forechecking ability has led to penalties, specifically in the two games in which he played for the Golden Knights against the Kings. He’s considered a playoff type player, but his career record in the playoffs is 15-21.

Oscar Lindberg
14 Playoff games
(3 goals, 4 points, 52.6 FO%, 10:27 ATOI)

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Reaves, Gallant Mentioned In NHLPA Player’s Poll

3rd!?! C’mon NHL. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Once a year the NHL Player’s Association conducts a poll in which they ask multiple questions to current NHL players. Questions asked ranged from fastest current skater to best defenseman of all time.

Two Golden Knights were mentioned in the poll including one of the largest vote totals of any category. That distinction went to new Golden Knight, Ryan Reaves, in the category of “toughest player.”

The other Golden Knight was All Star head coach Gerard Gallant.

Gallant received 31 votes from the 267 players who voted in the poll.

Slightly surprisingly, maybe depending on when the poll was conducted (between preseason and January), T-Mobile Arena was not listed in the results for best arena, best ice, or best fans.

To see the rest of the results, click here.

Golden Knights Must Get Back To Being Themselves

The Golden Knights do not have their own “way” like the New England Patriots. They did not come up with a different scheme of play like the “run and gun” Showtime Era Los Angeles Lakers. Nor are they trying to re-invent the game of hockey like the Moneyball Oakland A’s did baseball. But what the Golden Knights have done is carved out a style in which they prefer to play, and when they stick to it, they win.

Reel em back in David. (Photo Credit: SinBin.vegas Photographer Brandon Andreasen)

Vegas has been at or near the top of the NHL standings the entire year. They’ve yet to experience a losing streak beyond three games, and when I asked a bunch of players the question, “what’s been the toughest thing your team has gone through this year,” every single guy started his response the same way, by cocking their head to the side and saying “I don’t know.”

We’ve come to know the Golden Knights as a fast, quick, transition heavy, high scoring chance team that never believes its out of a game and very rarely, if ever, partake in the rough physical style of play commonly seen in the Pacific Division. Whether this is the reason or not, Vegas had jumped out to a 16-1-1 record against the seven teams in their division. They were undefeated against the likes of the Kings, Ducks, and Sharks before the last 10 days. Then Tuesday happened, and those Golden Knights were nowhere to be found.

All year we haven’t really gotten into scrums all that much. We need to play the way we’ve played all year. We’ve had success and I think for Ryan he is trying to make an impression. When we were in St. Louis it was about getting into the net all the time with Coach Hitchcock. I think that he came here and he wants to do that, he wants to show that he cares, he’s got to learn though a little bit about the way we play. I don’t think he’s going to have a problem with that. -David Perron

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Examining The Ryan Reaves Hits/Penalties

The end of the second game on back to back nights with the Los Angeles Kings got a bit out of hand, and the man in the middle of all of it was newly acquired Ryan Reaves.

With Vegas trailing by two and less than 10 minutes to go, Reaves was called with two penalties, made two other strong hits, and indirectly caused Gerard Gallant to be charged with a bench minor.

Here are the hits, the calls, the rules, and where I come in on each play.

Penalty 1 – 12:20 – Boarding

41.1 Boarding – A boarding penalty shall be imposed on any player who checks or pushes a defenseless opponent in such a manner that causes the opponent to hit or impact the boards violently or dangerously. -NHL Rule Book

Analysis: By the letter of the law, this is essentially textbook boarding. Reaves checks the player, who is absolutely defenseless, in such a manner that causes the opponent to impact the boards violently.

The puck is absolutely out of the play and the intent of Reaves is not hockey-oriented, instead, it is to finish a hit.

This being said, I’m completely aware of how often calls like this are not made. Boarding can be called on a lot of checks in the NHL. However, this one has two factors that made it even more likely for it to be called. First, Reaves loads up on the check. He brings his shoulder back to try and completely demolish the Kings player. The second is who is committing the infraction, Ryan Reaves. He is known for this type of behavior and referees have a tighter eye on him.

Could it have been let go, sure, but this is boarding.

Penalty 2 – 16:37 – Roughing

51.1 Roughing – Roughing is a punching motion with the hand or fist, with or without the glove on the hand, normally directed at the head or face of an opponent. -NHL Rule Book

Analysis: This one is much closer than the last one. There is technically a punching motion directed at the back of the head of the Kings player, however, Reaves’ hand is on the stick and the contact does not appear to be enough to have drawn the penalty.

Referees are allowed discretion to decide when a call should or should not be made. By rule, many penalties could be called in the course of a game, but refs choose not to for various reasons. Reaves’ action did not effect the play, it did not hurt the player, and it probably didn’t even lean cleanly.

This is a case of the referee seeing that Reaves needs to be stopped, so he makes a call to try and get him off the ice. Understandably, Reaves had turned into a wild man, but to make this call is harsh. Then, the referee doubled down by handing out a bench minor to Gallant for being upset over it. With the call being so tight, the ref has to use better judgment to allow Gallant to challenge the call verbally without drawing a second penalty.

No Call – Extra Hits that could be have been ruled charging

42.1 Charging shall mean the actions of a player who, as a result of distance traveled, shall violently check an opponent in any manner. A “charge” may be the result of a check into the boards, into the goal frame or in open ice. -NHL Rule Book

The first one is a clean check that is a hockey play. Reaves is challenging for the puck and impacts the player to attempt to change the play. No call should have been made, no call was.

The second one is charging. Reaves travels an extended distance to deliver a violent check to a player well after the puck is gone. It was let go, which is also a potential reason why the roughing penalty may have been called later.

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